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Song Parodies -> "Plop Went The Edsel"

Original Song Title:

"Pop Goes The Weasel"

Original Performer:

Traditional

Parody Song Title:

"Plop Went The Edsel"

Parody Written by:

Airfarcewon

The Lyrics

All around the Ford dealerships
No salesmen used their pencil
They sold a few, but hardly none
Plop Went The Edsel!

First came out nineteen fifty eight
Pretty hard to peddle
Big "O" expression on the grille
Plop Went The Edsel!

High hopes were smashed like surf on the rocks
A strange design of metal
Ford lost it's shirt, it's shoes and it's sox
Plop Went The Edsel!

Four models rolled off the line
Dropped the soup and kettle
Public gave a thumbs down sign
Plop Went The Edsel!

Yeah, Plop Went The Edsel!

(But, everybody wishes they had one, today!)

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 LittleLots
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Voting Results

 
Pacing: 5.0
How Funny: 5.0
Overall Rating: 5.0

Total Votes: 11

Voting Breakdown

The following represent how many people voted for each category.

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 2   0
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 3   0
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 5   11
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User Comments

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John Barry - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
An Edsel-wise parody.
Tim Hall - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
Imagine a straight head-on collision between a 1958 Edsel and a 1950 Stodebaker.
alvin - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
especially liked the shirt / shoes / sox line
Kristof Robertson - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
What is this Edsel to which you refer? Although I wasn't down with the specific vehicle, I can relate to automotive lemons. 555
John Jenkins - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
I like the surf on the rocks metaphor. Excellent spoof of something that was not one of Ford's better ideas.
2Eagle - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
Actually it was 1957 and I saw quite a few of them on the road.
AFW - November 21, 2007 - Report this comment
Thanks, John,...and Tim...true, that would be a rather sexy accident...thanks, alvin...and Kristof, Edsel was a radically styled Ford model automobile, that's been called one of the greatest goofs of all time...Keyword, or Google it on your pc...for more details...and thanks, John, and 2Eagle...came out in 57. but the first model year was a 58
KarK - November 22, 2007 - Report this comment
Never heard of the Edsel, but a a merry little ditty nevertheless! 555
MrMacphisto - November 22, 2007 - Report this comment
Classic... 5-5-5
Guy - November 22, 2007 - Report this comment
Verbatum

Edsel defined by dictionary.com:

Edsel :

The make of car was introduced 1956, named for Henry and Clara Ford's only child; figurative sense of "something useless and unwanted" is almost as old. Edsel is a family name, attested since 14c. (William de Egeshawe), from High Edser in Ewhurst, Surrey.:

So Kristof your country can take the credit for this money loser.

Great idea AFW and according to dictionary.com the vehicle was introduced in 1956 - I'm surmising these were proto types which are now call concepts - which would have likely put it on the drawing boards in '55, just right for your vote. And yeah, I wish I had one, but back then everyone wanted two. One to shat upon and the other to cover up the shat.

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